August 4th, 2017

World Photo Day: The Evolution of the Camera

Olympus film camera

Photography wouldn’t be possible without the incredible invention of the camera. According to Kodak, “the use of photographic film was pioneered by George Eastman, who started manufacturing paper film in 1885 before switching to celluloid in 1889. His first camera, which he called the ‘Kodak,’ was first offered for sale in 1888.”

It truly is amazing how much the camera has evolved since then. In came the digital camera, and the debate between film vs. digital began. Today, people appreciate the merits of both, and choose based on their preferred aesthetic.

If you love the nostalgia of film, you’re not alone. Film offers a creative challenge for photographers. Shooting analog photographs is an art form that truly embraces the candid nature of photography. The excitement of having your film photos developed, anxiously awaiting the final images, is a feeling many people love. There is something to be said about the simplicity of shooting with film too; without a Photoshop program to edit with, the result is a much rawer, visceral image. There is also a great deal more thoughtfulness involved in film photography, as you are limited by the amount of film you have. This is one of the reasons why many people recommend starting out on a film camera, even if you want to shoot digital. Being forced to be more selective with your shots will ultimately make you a better photographer, whether you shoot on film or digital.

Meanwhile, if you prefer to shoot digital, there are plenty of benefits that come with the ever-evolving technology of digital cameras. They are more convenient than ever, and are constantly being upgraded with more advanced features. Photographers can choose from point and shoots, DSLRs, and even compact mirrorless cameras, depending on what the situation requires. Today, many digital cameras also come with added features such as WiFi and Bluetooth. This allows you to directly transfer images to your smartphone or tablet, making it super easy to share all of your great moments.

Nikon camera and Nikon lenses

As digital technology has progressed, mobile phones have become the camera of choice for many people who wish to snap and share moments instantaneously. Some of you may remember seeing the #shotoniphone7 campaign, which inspired iPhone users to take incredible photographic shots simply using their phones’ camera. Today, millions of photos are uploaded every minute, allowing us to share our snapshots with the world in seconds, and find inspiration in the talent of other passionate photographers worldwide.

Whichever you prefer, London Drugs proudly offers a large selection of both digital cameras as well as film, and still offers film developing.

If you’re looking to upgrade your current gear, whether it’s a phone, film camera or DSLR, World Photo Day is a great time to see what’s out there and try something new. Our LDExperts can help you choose the right camera for your interests and needs. London Drugs’ selection of photography gear doesn’t end with cameras, either. We also have an extensive collection of lenses, camera accessories, photo printers and photo editing software to help you achieve the best images possible.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram to stay tuned for our World Photo Day deals (including a very special drone offer, available exclusively on August 19th)!



May 6th, 2015

Tech Talk Regina: David Levett speaks about cameras and Mother’s Day gift ideas

May is Photo Month, and it just happens to be Mother’s Day as well. On Monday April 27, London Drugs tech expert, David Levett, sat down on CTV Morning Live in Regina to discuss the latest cameras, camera accessories, and canon rebelMother’s Day gift ideas in celebration of Photo Month.

David started his discussion by mentioning the new camera upgrades to the Canon Rebel T6I. Since last year, a  wireless system linked to a mobile device has been installed in the Canon Rebel T6I. By downloading an app, the camera can be placed on any tripod to take photos and zoom anywhere you like from the control of your cellphone.

The waterproof, shockproof and freeze proof Nikon S33 was next on the list of camerasnikon to talk about. The camera comes with oversized buttons, which make it extremely user friendly. David matched the Nikon S33 with the Gorilla Pod, which can wrap around objects with its durable and flexible legs. This tripod is ideal for latching onto objects that usually wouldn’t act as a great surface for tripods, such as the branches of a tree.

selfie stickThe Table Tripod is a very straightforward Tripod that is compatible with any camera of camcorder.  David also mentioned the Travel Tripod, which is made out of a carbon fibre weave. The light, airy fixture makes travelling easy and hassle free.

Finally, David discussed the well-known Selfie Stick that has been making headlines lately. The Selfie Stick can be hooked up to a device on your cellphone that will allow you to zoom and take pictures with the click of a button, which is perfect for those much needed group photos.



September 29th, 2014

DSLR cameras for the avid amateur

I’m sure there are many amateur photographers who occasionally consider upgrading to a DSLR and would like to know more about how it would enhance their craft. After all, isn’t the photographer’s eye for composition what really matters?

Obviously a better camera results in better quality photos, and in this post I hope to address a few of the specific enhancements and possibilities that a DSLR can provide your photography. In particular, I’ll be looking at two of the newest models to hit the market from two of the industry’s most iconic brands:

(1) Nikon Full-Frame D750

Within Nikon’s current offering of full-frame DSLRs, the D750 represents an upgrade from the D610. It also incorporates some features from the D810; 51-point auto focus (AF), for example. This five-minute video from Nikon is a great overview of the D750’s features:

Video timeline:

  • 0:32 Smaller, lighter, more comfortable grip
  • 1:14 Tilting LCD screen
  • 2:00 Same AF as the D810
  • 2:27 Amazing low-light sensitivity
  • 2:47 Facial recognition auto-focus
  • 2:50 Same video capabilities as the D810
  • 3:14 Expeed 4 full-frame photography advantages
  • 3:50 Built-in flash commander; advantages for outdoor portraits
  • 4:40 6.5 FPS continuous shooting
  • 4:56 Built-in wifi for smartphone photo transfers and camera control

For those unfamiliar with the term, a full-frame digital DSLR camera has a sensor that’s about the same size as 35mm film. To fully explain it would require going into some detail about things like focal length and crop factor, which you can learn more about if you’re so inclined. Essentially, there are two main benefits to going full-frame:

  1. With a full-frame camera plus a standard wide-angle lens, you can capture much more impressive landscapes and building interiors.
  2. The sensor on a full-frame is larger than standard digital sensors, which means you can capture higher quality images—especially in low light.

Arguably the D750’s most notable upgrade is its 100-12800 (Lo 1 to Hi 2) ISO sensitivity, which is double that of the D610. In lay terms, this refers to the camera’s sensitivity to light. So if you’re planning on, say, going on a once-in-a-lifetime tour of European cathedrals, the D750 would definitely help you take beautiful shots in low light.

(2) Canon EOS 7D Mark II

As the 7D does not appear to be accompanied by its own concise-yet-informative YouTube video, I sought some expert advice; specifically Matt N. from the Camera Department at the Granville St. London Drugs. According to Matt, the Mark II has been eagerly anticipated by camera geeks everywhere since the original EOS 7D was discontinued. Together, we ran through its extensive list of features, which includes:

  • 65-Point All Cross Type AF
  • Rapid burst 10 FPS shooting
  • 20.2 megapixel APS-C Canon CMOS sensor
  • Dual DIGIC 6 Image Processors
  • Built-in GPS for location tracking
  • Built-in intervalometer for time-lapse capture
  • SuperSpeed USB 3.0 port
  • 100-16000 ISO range for still & video
  • 10 FPS high speed continuous burst shooting

Unlike the D750, the Mark II is not a full-frame camera. However, its APS-C sensor and Intelligent Viewfinder provide approximately 100% field of view plus exceptional low-light performance. Matt was particularly impressed with the Mark II, calling it a huge upgrade over its predecessor; in fact, he described both its ISO (low-light capabilities) and 10 FPS (high-speed) shooting as “ridiculous.”

Either of these two cameras provide the tools to help you capture infinitely better photos, no matter what, where or when you’re shooting. With larger sensors and pixels capable of storing more information, they also provide you with many more options when it comes to printing and display. (In fact, there’s a whole other post about them.)

image1

The “ridiculous” (in a good way) Mark II

 

 



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